Your Online Source for Plant-Based Research Articles

Welcome to plantbasedresearch.org, an online narrative review of peer-reviewed, scientific research papers and educational resources that are relevant to plant-based nutrition. Links to the abstract are included with every article, and links to the free full articles are included when possible! A narrative review is a collection of research papers supporting a particular theory - this website is by no means an exhaustive directory of all research on nutrition and disease but presents the growing body of evidence supporting the theory that whole food, plant-based diets offer the best chance for avoiding chronic disease, and in some cases, reversing it.

To browse scientific papers a variety of topics visit our "Research Articles by Category" page. Please Join Our Newsletter for updates on new studies! Or, do a site search to find information by keyword. Visit the Participate in Research Studies to join the recruitment list for future studies. Thank you for your interest in plant-based nutrition.

 

Seventh-Day Adventist vegetarians have a quiescent proliferative activity in colonic mucosa.

The proliferation of epithelial cells in colonic mucosa was studied in humans at varying degrees of risk for colon cancer. Seventh-Day Adventist vegetarians, known to have significantly lower mortality from colon cancer than the general U.S. population, had the most quiescent proliferative activity of mucosal epithelial cells. Increased replication and expansion of the proliferative compartment accompanied increased colon cancer risk.

Diet, lipoproteins and the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. The Leiden Intervention Trial.

The relationship between diet, serum lipoproteins, and the progression of coronary lesions was studied in 39 patients with stable angina pectoris in whom coronary arteriography had shown at least 1 vessel with 50% obstruction before intervention. Intervention consisted of a 2-year vegetarian diet that had a ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids of at least 2.0, and that contained less than 100mg of cholesterol per day.

Vegetarian diet in mild hypertension: a randomised controlled trial.

In a randomised crossover trial 58 subjects aged 30-64 with mild untreated hypertension were allocated either to a control group eating a typical omnivorous diet or to one of two groups eating an ovolactovegetarian diet for one of two six week periods. A fall in systolic blood pressure of the order of 5 mm Hg occurred during the vegetarian diet periods, with a corresponding rise on resuming a meat diet.

Controlled study of the effects of dietary protein on blood pressure in normotensive humans.

1. The object of this study was to determine whether meat protein per se is responsible for the higher blood pressures (BP) in omnivores compared with vegetarians. 2. Assessments were made by a double blind randomized control trial in 64 normotensive volunteers recruited from Royal Perth Hospital staff. 3. All volunteers were given a 'meat' substitute during the 2 week control period.

Controlled study of the effects of dietary protein on blood pressure in normotensive humans.

1. The object of this study was to determine whether meat protein per se is responsible for the higher blood pressures (BP) in omnivores compared with vegetarians. 2. Assessments were made by a double blind randomized control trial in 64 normotensive volunteers recruited from Royal Perth Hospital staff. 3. All volunteers were given a 'meat' substitute during the 2 week control period.

Chronic disease among Seventh-day Adventists, a low-risk group. Rationale, methodology, and description of the population.

The Adventist Health Study is a prospective cohort study of 34,198 non-Hispanic white Seventh-day Adventists (13,857 men; 20,341 women, age 25-100 years) followed for 6 years (1977-1982). Within this population, 55.2% were lacto-ovovegetarian (consumed meat, poultry, or fish less than one time per week with no restrictions as to egg or dairy product consumption) in 1976 and most abstained from alcohol, tobacco, and pork products.

Dietary habits and breast cancer incidence among Seventh-day Adventists.

Breast cancer incidence was monitored in a cohort of 20,341 California Seventh-day Adventist women who completed a detailed lifestyle questionnaire in 1976, and who were followed for 6 years. There were 215 histologically confirmed primary breast cancer detected among some 115,000 person-years of follow-up. Mean age at diagnosis was 66 years, indicating a primarily postmenopausal case series. Established risk factors for breast cancer showed strong relationships to risk in these data.

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